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Intex Usb To Serial Adapter Driver



Guaranteed CompatibilityWindows 7 Compatible 32-bit and 64-bitFully Serial / RS232 compatibleWe proudly boast about our 99% device compatibility ratio with this product! We also stand behind it. You may see others that look like ours, but ours comes with a driver for Windows 7, 32-bit as well as 64-bit.Commercial qualityOur USB to Serial Adapter Cable is used mainly by AV pros and other industrial techs. This cable works great to add a serial port to your new laptop that didn't come with one, and will allow you to work on equipment just like you used to with your old laptop. Easy SetupSetup is quick and easy. Just plug it in, pop in the driver disk, and be done within a minute or two. We've also included driver downloads on our site in case you want to try those with your current non-functioning adapter.Getting a Code 10 Error on your USB to Serial device? You don't have the correct driver chosen. You'll need to choose the 2008 driver, version 3.3.2.102 to correct the problem. Download the correct version below. If you purchased it from us, you can use our toll free tech support. We're native English speakers and are here Monday-Friday.DownloadsHow to fix a Code 10 ErrorWindows 7 Drivers, 32bit and 64bit (Latest Drivers)Windows XP Drivers (Latest Drivers)Mac Drivers (Latest Drivers)Prolific drivers site2009 VersionVista DriversWindows Drivers 2007 versionWindows Drivers 2003 versionMac DriversMac OS 10.3 DriversLinux DriversManual




intex usb to serial adapter driver



Connect your legacy Serial devices via USBIdeal for connecting:- Digital Cameras,- PDAs,- Cellular Phones,- Routers / PBXs,- Testing EquipmentMany of today's new computers come : legacy free, which means they have no serial or parallel ports. The adapter solves this problem by adding serial connectivity via an USB port.Now you can connect all of your legacy devices, such as PDAs, cell phones and digital cameras to your new computer.


The PS/2 port is a 6-pin mini-DIN connector used for connecting keyboards and mice to a PC compatible computer system. Its name comes from the IBM Personal System/2 series of personal computers, with which it was introduced in 1987. The PS/2 mouse connector generally replaced the older DE-9 RS-232 "serial mouse" connector, while the PS/2 keyboard connector replaced the larger 5-pin/180 DIN connector used in the IBM PC/AT design. The PS/2 keyboard port is electrically and logically identical to the IBM AT keyboard port, differing only in the type of electrical connector used. The PS/2 platform introduced a second port with the same design as the keyboard port for use to connect a mouse; thus the PS/2-style keyboard and mouse interfaces are electrically similar and employ the same communication protocol. However, unlike the otherwise similar Apple Desktop Bus connector used by Apple, a given system's keyboard and mouse port may not be interchangeable since the two devices use different sets of commands and the device drivers generally are hard-coded to communicate with each device at the address of the port that is conventionally assigned to that device. (That is, keyboard drivers are written to use the first port, and mouse drivers are written to use the second port.[1])


The interface has two main signal lines, Data and Clock. These are single-ended signals driven by open-collector drivers at each end. Normally, the transmission is from the device to the host. To transmit a byte, the device simply outputs a serial frame of data (including 8 bits of data and a parity bit) on the Data line serially as it toggles the Clock line once for each bit. The host controls the direction of communication using the Clock line; when the host pulls it low, communication from the attached device is inhibited. The host can interrupt the device by pulling Clock low while the device is transmitting; the device can detect this by Clock staying low when the device releases it to go high as the device-generated clock signal toggles. When the host pulls Clock low, the device must immediately stop transmitting and release Clock and Data to both float high. (So far, all of this is the same as the unidirectional communication protocol of the IBM PC keyboard port, though the serial frame formats differ.) The host can use this state of the interface simply to inhibit the device from transmitting when the host is not ready to receive. (For the IBM PC keyboard port, this was the only normal use of signalling from the computer to the keyboard. The keyboard could not be commanded to retransmit a keyboard scan code after it had been sent, since there was no reverse data channel to carry commands to the keyboard, so the only way to avoid losing scan codes when the computer was too busy to receive them was to inhibit the keyboard from sending them until the computer was ready. This mode of operation is still an option on the IBM AT and PS/2 keyboard port.)[4]


The PS/2 keyboard interface is electrically the same as the 5-pin DIN connector on earlier AT keyboards, and keyboards designed for one can be connected to the other with a simple wiring adapter. Such wiring adapters and adapter cables were once commonly available for sale. Note that IBM PC and PC XT keyboards use a different unidirectional protocol with the same DIN connector as AT keyboards, so though a PC or XT keyboard can be connected to PS/2 port using a wiring adapter intended for an AT keyboard, the earlier keyboard will not work with the PS/2 port. (At least, it cannot work with normal PS/2 keyboard driver software, including the system BIOS keyboard driver.) 350c69d7ab


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